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Let me introduce you to the 78 most important cards of your life: the tarot cards. You know, The Sun, The Empress, and, (actually-not-so-) terrifyingly, Death.

Tarot decks typically feature two groups of cards: the Minor Arcana and the Major Arcana. The Major Arcana features 22 cards numbered 0 to 21, and they represent the greater areas of life (Death is one of these, but in a tarot reading, it’s more likely to represent transformation than actual death death). The other 56 cards are called the Minor Arcana, and they illustrate the day-to-day trials and tribulations of life. They’re divided into four suits—Pentacles or Coins, Swords, Wands, and Cups. These cards have names like Three of Cups, King of Wands, Ace of Swords, etc.

Tarot actually has a long and fascinating history. The tradition of using cards to playfully predict the future likely goes back to the 14th-century Turkish cards called Mamluk, which were brought to Western Europe. Influenced by these cards, a card game called tarocchi became popular in 15th-century Italy. In France in the 1780s, the occultist Jean-Baptiste Alliette (also known as Etteilla) created a new deck intended for fortune-telling and popularized tarot as a form of divination rather than a game. Tarot became popular in the U.S. in the early 1900s, and the most well-known tarot deck, the Rider-Waite-Smith deck, was first published in 1909.

Thanks to crowdfunding campaigns, indie designers, and, y’know, the internet, we probably have more tarot decks to choose from than ever before. Which is great news when it comes to representation, creativity, and all that good stuff. If you’re shopping for your first tarot deck, pick the one that ~speaks~ to you. You might look for one with beautiful art, one with figures that look like you, or one that reflects your particular interests (like cats, maybe?).

Today, many tarot decks are based on the Rider-Waite-Smith deck, containing familiar names like The High Priestess or The Emperor. Others are based on the Thoth Tarot, created by Aleister Crowley and first published in 1969 after his death, or the Tarot of Marseilles, a French tarot deck first printed in 1709. All three of these decks have 78 cards divided into suit cards and a Major Arcana, but they have some different cards. While most modern-day tarot decks also include 78 cards, some tarot creators add a card or two. Other tarot creators keep the same number of cards but rename some of them, often with an eye to greater inclusivity. For example, the Weaver Tarot uses gender-neutral language, renaming the King cards as Rulers and the Queen cards as Sovereigns.

You can use tarot cards for all sorts of stuff. Think self-improvement, meditation, and decision-making. (See also: hanging with your crew and your rosé collection.) Tarot cards work like a mirror, if that mirror were magic: They reflect your inner wisdom and self to help guide you toward living a better life, whatever that means for you. They’ve even been used in therapy. Um, sign me up. I want to be a self-improvement queen!

Oh, and they’re, um, really pretty. Whether you want to learn to read them (I see you, you self-sufficient star) or liven up your living room, there are so many decks to choose from. Most come with guidebooks showing you how to interpret the cards and do simple tarot spreads, but there are plenty of great tarot books out there if you want to go more in depth. And while many tarot decks follow similar formats, artists are free to interpret and illustrate the familiar archetypes in different ways. BRB while I fill up my cart. Who said you can’t have more than one?

1

a tarot deck for *you*

The Cosmo Tarot: The Ultimate Deck and Guidebook

Hi, yes, we have a Cosmo tarot! Featuring gorgeous collage-style art (if we do say so ourselves) and an instructional guidebook by Sarah Potter, this deck was created with beginners in mind. If you’re reading this, we promise you’ll love it! 

2

the deck for art lovers

Mystic Mondays Tarot

This deck isn’t just cute (it *is* really cute tho), but it also includes instructions on everything you need to know to read ’em like a pro charge your friends for readings. Created by artist Grace Duong and first published in 2018 after being fully funded on Kickstarter, the Mystic Mondays Tarot is full of vibrant color and positive vibes. 

Also: It has its own app, so go ahead and hit “download” and “add to cart” at the same time.

3

the classic tarot deck

The Rider-Waite-Smith Tarot Deck

The Rider-Waite-Smith tarot deck was originally published way back in 1909, and it’s probably the most popular and influential tarot deck out there. Along with featuring iconic images you’ll recognize (there’s Death again!), the Rider-Waite-Smith deck has inspired many modern tarot creators to put their own twist on the cards, keeping the same or similar names and basic interpretations but adding new imagery. 

The cards were designed by illustrator Pamela Colman Smith, who may have been a queer woman of color (others say there isn’t clear evidence of her race or sexuality), but her contributions to the tarot were, and still sometimes are, often overlooked. In the past few years, a Pratt Institute art exhibit and a biography have drawn new attention to Colman Smith’s work.

4

the so-fancy deck

Ethereal Visions Illuminated Tarot Deck

This elegant deck is hand-drawn! Has gold-foil stamping! Is art-nouveau-inspired! I want it!

Created by artist Matt Hughes and first published in 2018, the Etheral Visions Illuminated Tarot is an art nouveau dream that basically belongs in a museum. Also, it includes two bonus cards.

5

the tarot that doubles as playing cards

The Illuminated Tarot

Instead of 78 cards, this tarot deck has 53—the same number as a deck of playing cards. However, it still contains the entire Minor Arcana and Major Arcana—some cards just serve double duty, representing both a card in the Minor Arcana and a card in the Major Arcana.

All this means that you can use your tarot deck for Go Fish or poker—cool, no? Designed and illustrated by Caitlin Keegan, this deck was first published in 2017.

6

for positive vibes

The Luna Sol Tarot

The Luna Sol Tarot uses “a soft color palette that gently warms the heart” and “wraps your intuition in a positive embrace.” With illustrations featuring people of all races, ages, and sizes, this tarot deck puts a modern twist on the traditional Rider-Waite-Smith deck.

7

the tarot deck for beginners

The Good Karma Tarot: A Beginner’s Guide to Reading the Cards

Kerry Ward, who y0u might know as the writer of our weekly tarot horoscopes, created the Good Karma Tarot. It’s designed for beginners, but its adorable illustrations mean that it appeals to pros too.

The Good Karma Tarot is designed to be used for personal guidance—consult it when you’re stuck between two career options, seeking relationship wisdom, or trying to figure out the source of your gut feeling.

8

for your next tat inspo

Tattoo Tarot: Ink & Intuition

Read your cards and pick out your next tattoo. It’s called multitasking. Published in 2018 by tarot reader and writer Diana McMahon-Collins, the Tattoo Tarot takes a classic tattoo art style and applies it to the traditional Rider-Waite-Smith iconography. And yeah, maybe you’ll pick up some fashion or hairstyle inspo too.

9

the tarot deck for intuitive readers

True Heart Intuitive Tarot Guidebook and Deck

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Created by tarot reader and actor Rachel True—star of ’90s classics like The Craft and Half-Baked—True Heart Intuitive Tarot focuses on intuitive tarot reading. The accompanying guidebook, which combines memoir with how-to instructions, teaches readers how to read cards intuitively instead of by memorizing meanings.

“With tarot, the magic isn’t in the cards. The magic is in what your mind feels and processes when you see the image from the card,” True previously told Cosmopolitan.

10

for comic fans

Star Spinner Tarot

Illustrated by indie comic artist Trungles, or Trung Le Nguyen, this deck incorporates fantasy beings like fairies and mermaids—plus it’s diverse and LGBTQ+ inclusive. Published in 2020, it is an Amazon best seller and offers multiple Lovers cards to reflect different sexualities and romantic expressions.

In the introduction to the guidebook, Trungles writes, “At the turn of the century, European tastemakers and artists would often misappropriate imagery from Africa and Asia to convey a superficial sense of mystery and exoticism. The Star Spinner is meant to evoke iconography that is less deeply rooted in that esoteric visual language and challenge the imperialist trappings of that time.”

11

for self-care

Neo Tarot: A Fresh Approach to Self-Care, Healing & Empowerment

Created by Jerico Mandybur and first published in 2019, the Neo Tarot focuses on tarot’s role as a healing tool. It includes colorfully illustrated cards with diverse representation and a detailed guidebook with self-care advice for each card (like baking something sweet for the Four of Wands).

12

The Tazama African Tarot

Published by Black-owned publisher Abusua Pa with art by Kenyan collage artist Safara Wanjagi, the Tazama African Tarot uses collage art to, as the creators put it, “embody African ancestry through historical images.” The name Tazama comes from the Swahili word meaning “to see.”

13

the feminist tarot deck

She Wolfe Tarot

The She Wolfe Tarot was created by artist and writer Devany Amber Wolfe and has been called the “ultimate feminist deck.” Featuring “themes of Goddess power, ancient Egypt, and vintage desert imagery,” the deck features diverse people and psychedelic designs.

14

El Tarot Deck: Millennial Lotería Edition

Created by Mike Alfaro—known for the Instagram account @MillennialLotería and Millennial Lotería game—this lotería-inspired tarot deck celebrates Latinx culture. The guidebook draws connections between the classic game of lotería and the practice of tarot.

Instead of predicting the future, this deck “is specifically designed to help you better understand your present and get in touch with your heritage,” reads the description. “The only person in charge of your future is you, so the guidebook accompanying this 78-card tarot deck focuses on self-reflection and inspiration for your goals, all done with a sprinkle of Millennial Lotería humor.”

15

the millennial-pink deck

OK Tarot: The Simple Deck for Everyone

This pretty-in-pink deck is minimalist, chic, and trendy enough to go with anything. Like your cubicle. Created by artist Adam J. Kurtz and first published in 2018, the OK Tarot style has been compared to a stick-and-poke tattoo. Although this deck is certainly cute, by boiling the tarot down to its most essential imagery, the OK Tarot’s simplicity is the point.

16

the dope tarot

Kaleidadope Tarot

The Kaleidadope Tarot, created by illustrator and author Krystal Banner and first launched in late 2020, is described as simply bringing “tarot into the 21st century with a mix of color, culture, and representation. It’s dope.” 

Taking inspiration from the Rider-Waite-Smith deck, Banner updates the imagery with modern references, like showing a variety of cups, including a red solo cup and a patterned coffee mug, in the Cups suit.

17

for Black history

The Black Power Tarot

Created by King Khan and illustrated by Michael Eaton, the Black Power Tarot contains 25 cards and is based on the Tarot de Marseilles. This deck incorporates figures from Black history, such as Richard Pryor for The Fool, Marie Laveau for The High Priestess, and Eartha Kitt for Justice.

18

the folk-art deck

Spirit Speak Tarot

Created by Nashville-based artist and intuitive Mary Elizabeth Evans and first published in 2014, the Spirit Speak Tarot reinterprets the Rider-Waite-Smith deck with folk art imagery. The black-and-white cards are simple and easy to interpret, making them a strong choice for beginners.

19

Tarot of the Divine: A Deck and Guidebook Inspired by Deities, Folklore, and Fairy Tales from Around the World: Tarot Cards

Illustrator Yoshi Yoshitani drew from various folklore, fables, and spiritual traditions to create the Tarot of the Divine. These intricately illustrated cards draw from the cultural traditions of China, Japan, Peru, Norway, Persia, England, Greece, Denmark, the Maori tribe of New Zealand, and more, while the guidebook explains the origins and meanings.

21

The Black Queer Tarot

The rise of crowdfunding means that independent creators have a new path to publishing their tarot decks—like the Black Queer Tarot. Created by Harlem-based artist Kendrick Daye using a (stunning!) signature collage technique, the Black Queer Tarot replaces the white faces on the Rider-Waite-Smith deck with diverse muses, imagining “worlds where liberation and freedom are alive and well-connected bedfellows. Worlds where Black queer people are not just living—we’re thriving.”

22

the holographic deck

The Holographic Tarot

The Holographic Tarot takes the imagery from the Rider-Waite-Smith deck and adds a shiny holographic luster. 

23

for cat lovers

Cat Tarot: 78 Cards & Guidebook

Look, I said there was a tarot deck for everything, including cats. Created by Megan Lynn Kott and first published in 2019, this deck reimagines the Rider-Waite deck with feline figures. It’s cute!

Also, have you seen those TikTok videos of the tarot-reading cat? Maybe you need this for your cat???

24

the ~elemental~ tarot

Elemental Power Tarot

Created by Melinda Lee Holm, the Elemental Power Tarot looks at the tarot through the lens of five elements: fire, water, air, earth, and spirit. This deck gets rid of human figures entirely. Instead, it incorporates objects and scenes from both the natural and human-made world, including a tire swing for Wheel of Fortune and a fluffy puppy for The Fool.

25

the melanated tarot deck

Dust II Onyx

Created by multimedia artist Courtney Alexander and first published in 2017, the Dust II Onyx Tarot features mixed-media collage designs that incorporate myths, symbolism, history, and icons from the Black diaspora—Alexander consulted nearly 75 resources when creating the deck, and the guidebook is more than 200 pages long. 

In an artist statement in the guidebook, Alexander describes imagining “a world beyond this dimension yet intrinsically connected to our own. A non-binary world where I could see myself and those I love as powerful and eternal beings. I believe, in this way, my art can be a tool of resistance and transformation not just politically but also at the root of one’s spirit.”

26

for reversal readings

The Truth Decks: Tarot Edition

Pretty Spirits Co.’s new deck, the Truth Decks: Tarot Edition (so named to distinguish it from the company’s popular oracle decks), takes an ingenious approach to reverse card readings. Traditionally, tarot cards have one meaning when drawn right side up and another when drawn upside down. 

Pretty Spirits Co. makes interpreting card reversals easy by including keywords on the deck along with the name of the card. For example, Justice includes the word “fairness” as the keyword for the card when it’s drawn right side up and “dishonesty” as the keyword for the card when it’s drawn upside down. Easy! Also, the illustrations are sooo cute.

27

the tarot deck for artists and creatives

The Muse Tarot: A 78-Card Deck and Guidebook

Published in 2020 by tarot creator Chris-Anne (she also created the Light-Seers’ Tarot and the Sacred Creators Oracle), the Muse Tarot is intended for creative people, whether writers, artists, musicians, fellow tarot readers, etc.—anyone who’s, well, looking for a muse.

This deck reimagines the four suits as Inspiration, Emotions, Voices, and Materials, so instead of cards like Three of Wands, you draw cards like Inspiration.

28

The Afro Tarot II

Created by artist Jessi Jumanji, the Afro Tarot is an Afrofuturist deck, taking inspiration from a variety of African cultures, places, symbols, and artifacts. It’s based on the Rider-Waite-Smith deck, making it accessible for beginners and tarot readers of all levels. As Jumanji puts it, “The Afro Tarot was created for people of the African diaspora seeking to incorporate an ancestral aspect into their spiritual journey.”

29

the gender-neutral tarot deck

The Weaver Tarot: Journeyer

First, the Weaver Journeyer tarot deck is HOLOGRAPHIC. How cool is that? It reflects light, looks different at every angle, and is just gorgeous. Created by Brit June and Blaire Porter for Threads of Fate, the Weaver Tarot is a “master manifester” deck, perfect for ~manifesting~ whatever you want. 

The tarot deck is also gender-neutral while still following the Rider-Waite-Smith format: Kings become Rulers, Queens become Sovereigns, and so on. Likewise, the cards opt to feature illustrations of objects or gender-neutral body parts—like a pair of hands—instead of drawings of people.

30

for witches and witch lovers

The Modern Witch Tarot Deck

If this deck looks familiar, that’s because it’s become a best seller since it was first published in 2019.

Created by illustrator Lisa Sterle, the Modern Witch Tarot takes the Rider-Waite-Smith symbolism and updates it with images of diverse young women.

31

for rootworkers

The Hoodoo Tarot: 78-Card Deck and Book for Rootworkers

Created by Tayannah Lee McQuillar, a tarot reader and researcher of religion and mysticism, this tarot deck celebrates American rootwork, or Hoodoo, a practice developed by Black and Indigenous Americans between the 17th and 19th centuries. McQuillar published a book on Hoodoo, Rootwork: Using the Folk Magick of Black America for Love, Money and Success, back in 2013 and incorporated her knowledge into The Hoodoo Tarot, first published in early 2020.

The deck features imagery depicting legendary rootworkers and important Hoodoo symbols. McQuillar previously told Cosmopolitan, “Tarot is filled with archetypes based on natural energies, at the end of the day. Rootwork is dealing with natural energies. It also has biblical aspects, and the tarot uses biblical images. There were just so many ways to tie these two together.”

32

for revolutionaries

Next World Tarot: Deck and Guidebook

The Next World Tarot centers “body outlaws, endangered cultures, and anti-colonial belief systems”—sign us up! Created by Cuban American artist Cristy C. Road, the Next World Tarot features diverse figures—inspired by Road’s own friends and acquaintances—in a dystopian landscape.

Basically, Road takes the 78 cards of the Rider-Waite-Smith Tarot and remixes them with a decidedly punk-rock outlook. Plus, the cards include keywords noted on them, making them a great choice for beginners.

33

for fans of both mythology and pop culture

The Shrine of the Black Medusa Tarot

Designed by Detroit-based artist Casey Rocheteau in 2014, the Shrine of the Black Medusa follows the Thoth tarot structure and pulls from 20th-century Black history, ’70s/’80s/’90s pop culture iconography, and ancient myths to create a colorful work of art.

34

for mythology fans

The Kemetic Tarot

There’s a long history of European tarot practitioners claiming that tarot is based on ancient Egyptian lorebut the creators of the Kemetic Tarot (Anna Dorzhieva, Michael Coles, and Aarhonda Cunningham) did exactly that, taking imagery and symbolism from The Book of Coming Forth by Day, a book of spells and ritual magic, and bringing them to the tarot. The Fool becomes the scribe Ani, the Major Arcana becomes the Neteru cards representing Kemetic deities, and the four Minor Arcana suits become Ankhs, Scarabs, Scepters, and Swords.

35

for pirates, mermaids, and water signs

Tempest Tarot Deck

If you love the water (or just The Shape of Water), check out the Tempest Tarot. Created by Maisy Bristol, this deck incorporates nautical imagery like ships, sea monsters, lighthouses, and mermaids.

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Let me introduce you to the 78 most important cards of your life: the tarot cards. You know, The Sun, The Empress, and, (actually-not-so-) terrifyingly, Death.

Tarot decks typically feature two groups of cards: the Minor Arcana and the Major Arcana. The Major Arcana features 22 cards numbered 0 to 21, and they represent the greater areas of life (Death is one of these, but in a tarot reading, it’s more likely to represent transformation than actual death death). The other 56 cards are called the Minor Arcana, and they illustrate the day-to-day trials and tribulations of life. They’re divided into four suits—Pentacles or Coins, Swords, Wands, and Cups. These cards have names like Three of Cups, King of Wands, Ace of Swords, etc.

Tarot actually has a long and fascinating history. The tradition of using cards to playfully predict the future likely goes back to the 14th-century Turkish cards called Mamluk, which were brought to Western Europe. Influenced by these cards, a card game called tarocchi became popular in 15th-century Italy. In France in the 1780s, the occultist Jean-Baptiste Alliette (also known as Etteilla) created a new deck intended for fortune-telling and popularized tarot as a form of divination rather than a game. Tarot became popular in the U.S. in the early 1900s, and the most well-known tarot deck, the Rider-Waite-Smith deck, was first published in 1909.

Thanks to crowdfunding campaigns, indie designers, and, y’know, the internet, we probably have more tarot decks to choose from than ever before. Which is great news when it comes to representation, creativity, and all that good stuff. If you’re shopping for your first tarot deck, pick the one that ~speaks~ to you. You might look for one with beautiful art, one with figures that look like you, or one that reflects your particular interests (like cats, maybe?).

Today, many tarot decks are based on the Rider-Waite-Smith deck, containing familiar names like The High Priestess or The Emperor. Others are based on the Thoth Tarot, created by Aleister Crowley and first published in 1969 after his death, or the Tarot of Marseilles, a French tarot deck first printed in 1709. All three of these decks have 78 cards divided into suit cards and a Major Arcana, but they have some different cards. While most modern-day tarot decks also include 78 cards, some tarot creators add a card or two. Other tarot creators keep the same number of cards but rename some of them, often with an eye to greater inclusivity. For example, the Weaver Tarot uses gender-neutral language, renaming the King cards as Rulers and the Queen cards as Sovereigns.

You can use tarot cards for all sorts of stuff. Think self-improvement, meditation, and decision-making. (See also: hanging with your crew and your rosé collection.) Tarot cards work like a mirror, if that mirror were magic: They reflect your inner wisdom and self to help guide you toward living a better life, whatever that means for you. They’ve even been used in therapy. Um, sign me up. I want to be a self-improvement queen!

Oh, and they’re, um, really pretty. Whether you want to learn to read them (I see you, you self-sufficient star) or liven up your living room, there are so many decks to choose from. Most come with guidebooks showing you how to interpret the cards and do simple tarot spreads, but there are plenty of great tarot books out there if you want to go more in depth. And while many tarot decks follow similar formats, artists are free to interpret and illustrate the familiar archetypes in different ways. BRB while I fill up my cart. Who said you can’t have more than one?

1

a tarot deck for *you*

The Cosmo Tarot: The Ultimate Deck and Guidebook

Hi, yes, we have a Cosmo tarot! Featuring gorgeous collage-style art (if we do say so ourselves) and an instructional guidebook by Sarah Potter, this deck was created with beginners in mind. If you’re reading this, we promise you’ll love it! 

2

the deck for art lovers

Mystic Mondays Tarot

This deck isn’t just cute (it *is* really cute tho), but it also includes instructions on everything you need to know to read ’em like a pro charge your friends for readings. Created by artist Grace Duong and first published in 2018 after being fully funded on Kickstarter, the Mystic Mondays Tarot is full of vibrant color and positive vibes. 

Also: It has its own app, so go ahead and hit “download” and “add to cart” at the same time.

3

the classic tarot deck

The Rider-Waite-Smith Tarot Deck

The Rider-Waite-Smith tarot deck was originally published way back in 1909, and it’s probably the most popular and influential tarot deck out there. Along with featuring iconic images you’ll recognize (there’s Death again!), the Rider-Waite-Smith deck has inspired many modern tarot creators to put their own twist on the cards, keeping the same or similar names and basic interpretations but adding new imagery. 

The cards were designed by illustrator Pamela Colman Smith, who may have been a queer woman of color (others say there isn’t clear evidence of her race or sexuality), but her contributions to the tarot were, and still sometimes are, often overlooked. In the past few years, a Pratt Institute art exhibit and a biography have drawn new attention to Colman Smith’s work.

4

the so-fancy deck

Ethereal Visions Illuminated Tarot Deck

This elegant deck is hand-drawn! Has gold-foil stamping! Is art-nouveau-inspired! I want it!

Created by artist Matt Hughes and first published in 2018, the Etheral Visions Illuminated Tarot is an art nouveau dream that basically belongs in a museum. Also, it includes two bonus cards.

5

the tarot that doubles as playing cards

The Illuminated Tarot

Instead of 78 cards, this tarot deck has 53—the same number as a deck of playing cards. However, it still contains the entire Minor Arcana and Major Arcana—some cards just serve double duty, representing both a card in the Minor Arcana and a card in the Major Arcana.

All this means that you can use your tarot deck for Go Fish or poker—cool, no? Designed and illustrated by Caitlin Keegan, this deck was first published in 2017.

6

for positive vibes

The Luna Sol Tarot

The Luna Sol Tarot uses “a soft color palette that gently warms the heart” and “wraps your intuition in a positive embrace.” With illustrations featuring people of all races, ages, and sizes, this tarot deck puts a modern twist on the traditional Rider-Waite-Smith deck.

7

the tarot deck for beginners

The Good Karma Tarot: A Beginner’s Guide to Reading the Cards

Kerry Ward, who y0u might know as the writer of our weekly tarot horoscopes, created the Good Karma Tarot. It’s designed for beginners, but its adorable illustrations mean that it appeals to pros too.

The Good Karma Tarot is designed to be used for personal guidance—consult it when you’re stuck between two career options, seeking relationship wisdom, or trying to figure out the source of your gut feeling.

8

for your next tat inspo

Tattoo Tarot: Ink & Intuition

Read your cards and pick out your next tattoo. It’s called multitasking. Published in 2018 by tarot reader and writer Diana McMahon-Collins, the Tattoo Tarot takes a classic tattoo art style and applies it to the traditional Rider-Waite-Smith iconography. And yeah, maybe you’ll pick up some fashion or hairstyle inspo too.

9

the tarot deck for intuitive readers

True Heart Intuitive Tarot Guidebook and Deck

Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

Created by tarot reader and actor Rachel True—star of ’90s classics like The Craft and Half-Baked—True Heart Intuitive Tarot focuses on intuitive tarot reading. The accompanying guidebook, which combines memoir with how-to instructions, teaches readers how to read cards intuitively instead of by memorizing meanings.

“With tarot, the magic isn’t in the cards. The magic is in what your mind feels and processes when you see the image from the card,” True previously told Cosmopolitan.

10

for comic fans

Star Spinner Tarot

Illustrated by indie comic artist Trungles, or Trung Le Nguyen, this deck incorporates fantasy beings like fairies and mermaids—plus it’s diverse and LGBTQ+ inclusive. Published in 2020, it is an Amazon best seller and offers multiple Lovers cards to reflect different sexualities and romantic expressions.

In the introduction to the guidebook, Trungles writes, “At the turn of the century, European tastemakers and artists would often misappropriate imagery from Africa and Asia to convey a superficial sense of mystery and exoticism. The Star Spinner is meant to evoke iconography that is less deeply rooted in that esoteric visual language and challenge the imperialist trappings of that time.”

11

for self-care

Neo Tarot: A Fresh Approach to Self-Care, Healing & Empowerment

Created by Jerico Mandybur and first published in 2019, the Neo Tarot focuses on tarot’s role as a healing tool. It includes colorfully illustrated cards with diverse representation and a detailed guidebook with self-care advice for each card (like baking something sweet for the Four of Wands).

12

The Tazama African Tarot

Published by Black-owned publisher Abusua Pa with art by Kenyan collage artist Safara Wanjagi, the Tazama African Tarot uses collage art to, as the creators put it, “embody African ancestry through historical images.” The name Tazama comes from the Swahili word meaning “to see.”

13

the feminist tarot deck

She Wolfe Tarot

The She Wolfe Tarot was created by artist and writer Devany Amber Wolfe and has been called the “ultimate feminist deck.” Featuring “themes of Goddess power, ancient Egypt, and vintage desert imagery,” the deck features diverse people and psychedelic designs.

14

El Tarot Deck: Millennial Lotería Edition

Created by Mike Alfaro—known for the Instagram account @MillennialLotería and Millennial Lotería game—this lotería-inspired tarot deck celebrates Latinx culture. The guidebook draws connections between the classic game of lotería and the practice of tarot.

Instead of predicting the future, this deck “is specifically designed to help you better understand your present and get in touch with your heritage,” reads the description. “The only person in charge of your future is you, so the guidebook accompanying this 78-card tarot deck focuses on self-reflection and inspiration for your goals, all done with a sprinkle of Millennial Lotería humor.”

15

the millennial-pink deck

OK Tarot: The Simple Deck for Everyone

This pretty-in-pink deck is minimalist, chic, and trendy enough to go with anything. Like your cubicle. Created by artist Adam J. Kurtz and first published in 2018, the OK Tarot style has been compared to a stick-and-poke tattoo. Although this deck is certainly cute, by boiling the tarot down to its most essential imagery, the OK Tarot’s simplicity is the point.

16

the dope tarot

Kaleidadope Tarot

The Kaleidadope Tarot, created by illustrator and author Krystal Banner and first launched in late 2020, is described as simply bringing “tarot into the 21st century with a mix of color, culture, and representation. It’s dope.” 

Taking inspiration from the Rider-Waite-Smith deck, Banner updates the imagery with modern references, like showing a variety of cups, including a red solo cup and a patterned coffee mug, in the Cups suit.

17

for Black history

The Black Power Tarot

Created by King Khan and illustrated by Michael Eaton, the Black Power Tarot contains 25 cards and is based on the Tarot de Marseilles. This deck incorporates figures from Black history, such as Richard Pryor for The Fool, Marie Laveau for The High Priestess, and Eartha Kitt for Justice.

18

the folk-art deck

Spirit Speak Tarot

Created by Nashville-based artist and intuitive Mary Elizabeth Evans and first published in 2014, the Spirit Speak Tarot reinterprets the Rider-Waite-Smith deck with folk art imagery. The black-and-white cards are simple and easy to interpret, making them a strong choice for beginners.

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Tarot of the Divine: A Deck and Guidebook Inspired by Deities, Folklore, and Fairy Tales from Around the World: Tarot Cards

Illustrator Yoshi Yoshitani drew from various folklore, fables, and spiritual traditions to create the Tarot of the Divine. These intricately illustrated cards draw from the cultural traditions of China, Japan, Peru, Norway, Persia, England, Greece, Denmark, the Maori tribe of New Zealand, and more, while the guidebook explains the origins and meanings.

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The Black Queer Tarot

The rise of crowdfunding means that independent creators have a new path to publishing their tarot decks—like the Black Queer Tarot. Created by Harlem-based artist Kendrick Daye using a (stunning!) signature collage technique, the Black Queer Tarot replaces the white faces on the Rider-Waite-Smith deck with diverse muses, imagining “worlds where liberation and freedom are alive and well-connected bedfellows. Worlds where Black queer people are not just living—we’re thriving.”

22

the holographic deck

The Holographic Tarot

The Holographic Tarot takes the imagery from the Rider-Waite-Smith deck and adds a shiny holographic luster. 

23

for cat lovers

Cat Tarot: 78 Cards & Guidebook

Look, I said there was a tarot deck for everything, including cats. Created by Megan Lynn Kott and first published in 2019, this deck reimagines the Rider-Waite deck with feline figures. It’s cute!

Also, have you seen those TikTok videos of the tarot-reading cat? Maybe you need this for your cat???

24

the ~elemental~ tarot

Elemental Power Tarot

Created by Melinda Lee Holm, the Elemental Power Tarot looks at the tarot through the lens of five elements: fire, water, air, earth, and spirit. This deck gets rid of human figures entirely. Instead, it incorporates objects and scenes from both the natural and human-made world, including a tire swing for Wheel of Fortune and a fluffy puppy for The Fool.

25

the melanated tarot deck

Dust II Onyx

Created by multimedia artist Courtney Alexander and first published in 2017, the Dust II Onyx Tarot features mixed-media collage designs that incorporate myths, symbolism, history, and icons from the Black diaspora—Alexander consulted nearly 75 resources when creating the deck, and the guidebook is more than 200 pages long. 

In an artist statement in the guidebook, Alexander describes imagining “a world beyond this dimension yet intrinsically connected to our own. A non-binary world where I could see myself and those I love as powerful and eternal beings. I believe, in this way, my art can be a tool of resistance and transformation not just politically but also at the root of one’s spirit.”

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for reversal readings

The Truth Decks: Tarot Edition

Pretty Spirits Co.’s new deck, the Truth Decks: Tarot Edition (so named to distinguish it from the company’s popular oracle decks), takes an ingenious approach to reverse card readings. Traditionally, tarot cards have one meaning when drawn right side up and another when drawn upside down. 

Pretty Spirits Co. makes interpreting card reversals easy by including keywords on the deck along with the name of the card. For example, Justice includes the word “fairness” as the keyword for the card when it’s drawn right side up and “dishonesty” as the keyword for the card when it’s drawn upside down. Easy! Also, the illustrations are sooo cute.

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the tarot deck for artists and creatives

The Muse Tarot: A 78-Card Deck and Guidebook

Published in 2020 by tarot creator Chris-Anne (she also created the Light-Seers’ Tarot and the Sacred Creators Oracle), the Muse Tarot is intended for creative people, whether writers, artists, musicians, fellow tarot readers, etc.—anyone who’s, well, looking for a muse.

This deck reimagines the four suits as Inspiration, Emotions, Voices, and Materials, so instead of cards like Three of Wands, you draw cards like Inspiration.

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The Afro Tarot II

Created by artist Jessi Jumanji, the Afro Tarot is an Afrofuturist deck, taking inspiration from a variety of African cultures, places, symbols, and artifacts. It’s based on the Rider-Waite-Smith deck, making it accessible for beginners and tarot readers of all levels. As Jumanji puts it, “The Afro Tarot was created for people of the African diaspora seeking to incorporate an ancestral aspect into their spiritual journey.”

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the gender-neutral tarot deck

The Weaver Tarot: Journeyer

First, the Weaver Journeyer tarot deck is HOLOGRAPHIC. How cool is that? It reflects light, looks different at every angle, and is just gorgeous. Created by Brit June and Blaire Porter for Threads of Fate, the Weaver Tarot is a “master manifester” deck, perfect for ~manifesting~ whatever you want. 

The tarot deck is also gender-neutral while still following the Rider-Waite-Smith format: Kings become Rulers, Queens become Sovereigns, and so on. Likewise, the cards opt to feature illustrations of objects or gender-neutral body parts—like a pair of hands—instead of drawings of people.

30

for witches and witch lovers

The Modern Witch Tarot Deck

If this deck looks familiar, that’s because it’s become a best seller since it was first published in 2019.

Created by illustrator Lisa Sterle, the Modern Witch Tarot takes the Rider-Waite-Smith symbolism and updates it with images of diverse young women.

31

for rootworkers

The Hoodoo Tarot: 78-Card Deck and Book for Rootworkers

Created by Tayannah Lee McQuillar, a tarot reader and researcher of religion and mysticism, this tarot deck celebrates American rootwork, or Hoodoo, a practice developed by Black and Indigenous Americans between the 17th and 19th centuries. McQuillar published a book on Hoodoo, Rootwork: Using the Folk Magick of Black America for Love, Money and Success, back in 2013 and incorporated her knowledge into The Hoodoo Tarot, first published in early 2020.

The deck features imagery depicting legendary rootworkers and important Hoodoo symbols. McQuillar previously told Cosmopolitan, “Tarot is filled with archetypes based on natural energies, at the end of the day. Rootwork is dealing with natural energies. It also has biblical aspects, and the tarot uses biblical images. There were just so many ways to tie these two together.”

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for revolutionaries

Next World Tarot: Deck and Guidebook

The Next World Tarot centers “body outlaws, endangered cultures, and anti-colonial belief systems”—sign us up! Created by Cuban American artist Cristy C. Road, the Next World Tarot features diverse figures—inspired by Road’s own friends and acquaintances—in a dystopian landscape.

Basically, Road takes the 78 cards of the Rider-Waite-Smith Tarot and remixes them with a decidedly punk-rock outlook. Plus, the cards include keywords noted on them, making them a great choice for beginners.

33

for fans of both mythology and pop culture

The Shrine of the Black Medusa Tarot

Designed by Detroit-based artist Casey Rocheteau in 2014, the Shrine of the Black Medusa follows the Thoth tarot structure and pulls from 20th-century Black history, ’70s/’80s/’90s pop culture iconography, and ancient myths to create a colorful work of art.

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for mythology fans

The Kemetic Tarot

There’s a long history of European tarot practitioners claiming that tarot is based on ancient Egyptian lorebut the creators of the Kemetic Tarot (Anna Dorzhieva, Michael Coles, and Aarhonda Cunningham) did exactly that, taking imagery and symbolism from The Book of Coming Forth by Day, a book of spells and ritual magic, and bringing them to the tarot. The Fool becomes the scribe Ani, the Major Arcana becomes the Neteru cards representing Kemetic deities, and the four Minor Arcana suits become Ankhs, Scarabs, Scepters, and Swords.

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for pirates, mermaids, and water signs

Tempest Tarot Deck

If you love the water (or just The Shape of Water), check out the Tempest Tarot. Created by Maisy Bristol, this deck incorporates nautical imagery like ships, sea monsters, lighthouses, and mermaids.

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