Quick Telecast
Expect News First

Can Covid affect your sleep and what to do about it?

0 49


If you’ve got Covid, you might want to just ‘sleep it off’ – but what if you can’t? (Picture: Getty)

Although the UK is transitioning from a pandemic to an endemic, with free Covid-19 testing now scrapped, coronavirus is still very much circulating.

Some have reported that they found Covid-19 stopped them from getting the necessary amount of sleep.

But is there a link between the virus and sleep – and what can you do to ensure you get a good night’s kip?

Here is everything you need to know.

Does Covid affect your sleep?

There are many health experts and reports suggest that Covid-19 can have an impact on your sleep.

As Your Covid Recovery states: ‘Many people recovering from Covid-19 notice that their sleep has changed when compared to their sleep before they became unwell.

To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web
browser that
supports HTML5
video

‘Some people find it difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep, and others find they wake up earlier than usual and can’t get back to sleep.’

The reason for Covid-19 affecting your sleep is partly because many of the common symptoms associated can keep a person up out of discomfort.

Symptoms include breathlessness, a dry cough, and fever; all of which can make it difficult to sleep.

Another common symptom is fatigue which can lead to daytime sleep, disrupting your sleep cycle and making it difficult to get back on track.

If you currently have – or recently have had – Covid-19 and are concerned your sleeping patterns might be impacted in the long run, it’s not uncommon to see a shift in sleep when you’ve been unwell.

Having any illness can have an impact on your sleep – be it the amount you get or the quality of sleep.

The symptoms of Covid aren’t conducive to a good sleep (Picture: Getty)

NHS Scotland explains: ‘During any illness it’s common to sleep more as your body fights the infection.

‘While you’re recovering, it’s also common to have disturbed sleep patterns. You may struggle to get back into a good routine.’

How to sleep better with Covid

The NHS’ Your Covid Recovery explains some sleep tips, applicable for either when you’re ill or when you’re just struggling with sleep.

These include:

  • Get up at the same time every morning, even on weekends and holidays
  • Keep a notepad by the side of the bed to jot down things that come to mind. This will help you to park the thought and return to sleep
  • If it is possible, try to have the bedroom at a cool temperature
Good sleep hygiene tips can apply whether you have Covid or not (Picture: NHS)

If you have Covid-19 and are struggling with a cough or what feels like a build-up of fluids around your chest or lungs, there’s a sleep position that can help.

According to peer-reviewed medical research, ‘the prone position’ allows for better expansion of the back and lung region, which can enhance the body’s removal of fluid build-up in the lungs.

The prone position involves lying on your stomach with your head (on a pillow) turned to one side and your arms tucked beneath your chest. You can also bring both arms out to the sides for shoulder comfort.

You can place a pillow under your hips, abdomen, or shins to relieve any tension that might occur in these areas.

young woman inhaling steam

Steam can thin the mucus, making it easier to breathe (Picture: Getty)

You can also try to loosen any mucus by having a steamy shower or a DIY steam with a bowl or vapouriser before bed.

The steam may help thin out and drain mucus, which can make it easier to breathe. A warm shower is also a great way to relax before bedtime. 


MORE : How to get back to sleep in the middle of the night – tips from a sleep expert


MORE : Record 4,900,000 people in UK had Covid last week

Follow Metro across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Share your views in the comments below.

window.fbApi = (function () {

var fbApiInit = false; var awaitingReady = [];

var notifyQ = function () { var i = 0, l = awaitingReady.length; for (i = 0; i < l; i++) { awaitingReady[i](); } }; var ready = function (cb) { if (fbApiInit) { cb(); } else { awaitingReady.push(cb); } }; var checkLoaded = function () { return fbApiInit; }; window.fbAsyncInit = function () { FB.init({ appId: '176908729004638', xfbml: true, version: 'v2.10' }); fbApiInit = true; notifyQ(); }; return { 'ready' : ready, 'loaded' : checkLoaded }; })(); (function () { function injectFBSDK() { if ( window.fbApi && window.fbApi.loaded() ) return; var d = document, s="script", id = 'facebook-jssdk'; var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) { return; } js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.async = true; js.src = "https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); } if ('object' === typeof metro) { window.addEventListener('metro:scroll', injectFBSDK, {once: true}); } else { window.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', injectFBSDK, {once: true}); } })();


woman in bed with a cold

If you’ve got Covid, you might want to just ‘sleep it off’ – but what if you can’t? (Picture: Getty)

Although the UK is transitioning from a pandemic to an endemic, with free Covid-19 testing now scrapped, coronavirus is still very much circulating.

Some have reported that they found Covid-19 stopped them from getting the necessary amount of sleep.

But is there a link between the virus and sleep – and what can you do to ensure you get a good night’s kip?

Here is everything you need to know.

Does Covid affect your sleep?

There are many health experts and reports suggest that Covid-19 can have an impact on your sleep.

As Your Covid Recovery states: ‘Many people recovering from Covid-19 notice that their sleep has changed when compared to their sleep before they became unwell.

To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web
browser that
supports HTML5
video

‘Some people find it difficult to fall asleep or stay asleep, and others find they wake up earlier than usual and can’t get back to sleep.’

The reason for Covid-19 affecting your sleep is partly because many of the common symptoms associated can keep a person up out of discomfort.

Symptoms include breathlessness, a dry cough, and fever; all of which can make it difficult to sleep.

Another common symptom is fatigue which can lead to daytime sleep, disrupting your sleep cycle and making it difficult to get back on track.

If you currently have – or recently have had – Covid-19 and are concerned your sleeping patterns might be impacted in the long run, it’s not uncommon to see a shift in sleep when you’ve been unwell.

Having any illness can have an impact on your sleep – be it the amount you get or the quality of sleep.

The symptoms of Covid aren’t conducive to a good sleep (Picture: Getty)

NHS Scotland explains: ‘During any illness it’s common to sleep more as your body fights the infection.

‘While you’re recovering, it’s also common to have disturbed sleep patterns. You may struggle to get back into a good routine.’

How to sleep better with Covid

The NHS’ Your Covid Recovery explains some sleep tips, applicable for either when you’re ill or when you’re just struggling with sleep.

These include:

  • Get up at the same time every morning, even on weekends and holidays
  • Keep a notepad by the side of the bed to jot down things that come to mind. This will help you to park the thought and return to sleep
  • If it is possible, try to have the bedroom at a cool temperature
Good sleep hygiene tips can apply whether you have Covid or not (Picture: NHS)

If you have Covid-19 and are struggling with a cough or what feels like a build-up of fluids around your chest or lungs, there’s a sleep position that can help.

According to peer-reviewed medical research, ‘the prone position’ allows for better expansion of the back and lung region, which can enhance the body’s removal of fluid build-up in the lungs.

The prone position involves lying on your stomach with your head (on a pillow) turned to one side and your arms tucked beneath your chest. You can also bring both arms out to the sides for shoulder comfort.

You can place a pillow under your hips, abdomen, or shins to relieve any tension that might occur in these areas.

young woman inhaling steam

Steam can thin the mucus, making it easier to breathe (Picture: Getty)

You can also try to loosen any mucus by having a steamy shower or a DIY steam with a bowl or vapouriser before bed.

The steam may help thin out and drain mucus, which can make it easier to breathe. A warm shower is also a great way to relax before bedtime. 


MORE : How to get back to sleep in the middle of the night – tips from a sleep expert


MORE : Record 4,900,000 people in UK had Covid last week

Follow Metro across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Share your views in the comments below.

var fbApiInit = false; var awaitingReady = [];

var notifyQ = function () { var i = 0, l = awaitingReady.length; for (i = 0; i < l; i++) { awaitingReady[i](); } }; var ready = function (cb) { if (fbApiInit) { cb(); } else { awaitingReady.push(cb); } }; var checkLoaded = function () { return fbApiInit; }; window.fbAsyncInit = function () { FB.init({ appId: '176908729004638', xfbml: true, version: 'v2.10' }); fbApiInit = true; notifyQ(); }; return { 'ready' : ready, 'loaded' : checkLoaded }; })(); (function () { function injectFBSDK() { if ( window.fbApi && window.fbApi.loaded() ) return; var d = document, s="script", id = 'facebook-jssdk'; var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) { return; } js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.async = true; js.src = "https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); } if ('object' === typeof metro) { window.addEventListener('metro:scroll', injectFBSDK, {once: true}); } else { window.addEventListener('DOMContentLoaded', injectFBSDK, {once: true}); } })();

FOLLOW US ON GOOGLE NEWS

Read original article here

Denial of responsibility! Quick Telecast is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – [email protected]. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Leave a comment
buy kamagra buy kamagra online
Ads Blocker Image Powered by Code Help Pro

Ads Blocker Detected!!!

We have detected that you are using extensions to block ads. Please support us by disabling these ads blocker.

Powered By
Best Wordpress Adblock Detecting Plugin | CHP Adblock