Quick Telecast
Expect News First

SF commuters are arming themselves to walk past new sobriety centers

0 15


San Franciscans arm themselves with BASEBALL BATS and stun guns during their walks to work past notorious drug sobriety center amid fears addicts will attack them

Advertisement

San Francisco commuters are arming themselves with baseball bats and stun guns after a newly-opened drug sobering facility has drawn droves of violent druggies to a previously peaceful neighborhood. Residents of the SoMa neighborhood in northeast San Francisco are voicing outrage, saying ever since the SoMa RISE drug sobering center opened in June, ‘troublemakers’ have plagued the neighborhood.

Residents told Fox News that rather than tempering drug usage, the center has done little more than draw heavy users to the neighborhood. With those users comes crime, residents said, which casts a pall of danger over the neighborhood. The center was opened with the help of Democratic San Francisco Mayor London Breed, who characterized it as a safe haven for addicts looking to get back on their feet.

Residents told Fox News that rather than tempering drug usage, the center has done little more than draw heavy users to the neighborhood. With those users comes crime, residents said, which casts a pall of danger over the neighborhood. The center was opened with the help of Democratic San Francisco Mayor London Breed, who characterized it as a safe haven for addicts looking to get back on their feet.

Mayor Breed's office characterized SoMa as a 'safe indoor space' for addicts to 'get off the streets' and regather themselves and 'stabilize.' But SoMa resident and business owner Mark Sackett said things were not playing out nearly as the city intended. 'They're letting their clients come out here and get high, go inside and get sober and then get high again,' Sackett told ABC7. Pictured: Homeless people are seen in San Francisco.

Mayor Breed’s office characterized SoMa as a ‘safe indoor space’ for addicts to ‘get off the streets’ and regather themselves and ‘stabilize.’ But SoMa resident and business owner Mark Sackett said things were not playing out nearly as the city intended. ‘They’re letting their clients come out here and get high, go inside and get sober and then get high again,’ Sackett told ABC7. Pictured: Homeless people are seen in San Francisco.

Another resident, only identified as Ghis, gave a similar account to ABC7. 'More troublemakers settling in, feeling comfortable doing their drugs, [expletive] and [expletive] in the street blocking the sidewalks,' Ghis said, adding the neighborhood was going through 'a period of insanity. Another local named Bill said the trouble started when the center opened, and that ever since he has wondered whether he was in danger every time he left home to go to work.

Another resident, only identified as Ghis, gave a similar account to ABC7. ‘More troublemakers settling in, feeling comfortable doing their drugs, [expletive] and [expletive] in the street blocking the sidewalks,’ Ghis said, adding the neighborhood was going through ‘a period of insanity. Another local named Bill said the trouble started when the center opened, and that ever since he has wondered whether he was in danger every time he left home to go to work.

'Every morning it's a roulette. When you show up at your office, are there going to be 10 people passed out in front of your building?' he said. 'Are they going to be violent? This was never a problem before HealthRight 360 moved in.' 'If you ask me, it should be closed down and there should be other approaches to the homeless and drug problem we're all facing,' Bill added.

‘Every morning it’s a roulette. When you show up at your office, are there going to be 10 people passed out in front of your building?’ he said. ‘Are they going to be violent? This was never a problem before HealthRight 360 moved in.’ ‘If you ask me, it should be closed down and there should be other approaches to the homeless and drug problem we’re all facing,’ Bill added.

When the center opened in June, Mayor Breed (pictured) said the center would bring about a change in the lives of 'all San Franciscans.' 'Our city is experiencing a substance use and mental health crisis that is sadly affecting far too many residents,' she said. 'As we continue to address the challenges on our streets, we need to do all that we can to focus our resources and our efforts on those who need it most. The opening of the SoMa RISE Center will not only provide a safe space for individuals in need, but it brings us one step closer to making a difference in these people's lives and the lives of all San Franciscans.'

When the center opened in June, Mayor Breed (pictured) said the center would bring about a change in the lives of ‘all San Franciscans.’ ‘Our city is experiencing a substance use and mental health crisis that is sadly affecting far too many residents,’ she said. ‘As we continue to address the challenges on our streets, we need to do all that we can to focus our resources and our efforts on those who need it most. The opening of the SoMa RISE Center will not only provide a safe space for individuals in need, but it brings us one step closer to making a difference in these people’s lives and the lives of all San Franciscans.’

The center has been allocated at least $4.2million from taxpayers for 2022 and 2023, according to ABC7. Vitka Eisen, the CEO of HealthRight 360 - the entity which operates the center - asked locals to 'be patient with us.' 'We can't fix everything, but we're a piece of that,' Eisen said. 'A piece of the city trying novel things to respond to people experiencing homeless and street drug use and mental illness.'

 The center has been allocated at least $4.2million from taxpayers for 2022 and 2023, according to ABC7. Vitka Eisen, the CEO of HealthRight 360 – the entity which operates the center – asked locals to ‘be patient with us.’ ‘We can’t fix everything, but we’re a piece of that,’ Eisen said. ‘A piece of the city trying novel things to respond to people experiencing homeless and street drug use and mental illness.’

Want more stories like this from the Daily Mail? Visit our profile page here and hit the follow button above for more of the news you need.

Want more stories like this from the Daily Mail? Visit our profile page here and hit the follow button above for more of the news you need.


San Franciscans arm themselves with BASEBALL BATS and stun guns during their walks to work past notorious drug sobriety center amid fears addicts will attack them

Advertisement

San Francisco commuters are arming themselves with baseball bats and stun guns after a newly-opened drug sobering facility has drawn droves of violent druggies to a previously peaceful neighborhood. Residents of the SoMa neighborhood in northeast San Francisco are voicing outrage, saying ever since the SoMa RISE drug sobering center opened in June, ‘troublemakers’ have plagued the neighborhood.

Residents told Fox News that rather than tempering drug usage, the center has done little more than draw heavy users to the neighborhood. With those users comes crime, residents said, which casts a pall of danger over the neighborhood. The center was opened with the help of Democratic San Francisco Mayor London Breed, who characterized it as a safe haven for addicts looking to get back on their feet.

Residents told Fox News that rather than tempering drug usage, the center has done little more than draw heavy users to the neighborhood. With those users comes crime, residents said, which casts a pall of danger over the neighborhood. The center was opened with the help of Democratic San Francisco Mayor London Breed, who characterized it as a safe haven for addicts looking to get back on their feet.

Mayor Breed's office characterized SoMa as a 'safe indoor space' for addicts to 'get off the streets' and regather themselves and 'stabilize.' But SoMa resident and business owner Mark Sackett said things were not playing out nearly as the city intended. 'They're letting their clients come out here and get high, go inside and get sober and then get high again,' Sackett told ABC7. Pictured: Homeless people are seen in San Francisco.

Mayor Breed’s office characterized SoMa as a ‘safe indoor space’ for addicts to ‘get off the streets’ and regather themselves and ‘stabilize.’ But SoMa resident and business owner Mark Sackett said things were not playing out nearly as the city intended. ‘They’re letting their clients come out here and get high, go inside and get sober and then get high again,’ Sackett told ABC7. Pictured: Homeless people are seen in San Francisco.

Another resident, only identified as Ghis, gave a similar account to ABC7. 'More troublemakers settling in, feeling comfortable doing their drugs, [expletive] and [expletive] in the street blocking the sidewalks,' Ghis said, adding the neighborhood was going through 'a period of insanity. Another local named Bill said the trouble started when the center opened, and that ever since he has wondered whether he was in danger every time he left home to go to work.

Another resident, only identified as Ghis, gave a similar account to ABC7. ‘More troublemakers settling in, feeling comfortable doing their drugs, [expletive] and [expletive] in the street blocking the sidewalks,’ Ghis said, adding the neighborhood was going through ‘a period of insanity. Another local named Bill said the trouble started when the center opened, and that ever since he has wondered whether he was in danger every time he left home to go to work.

'Every morning it's a roulette. When you show up at your office, are there going to be 10 people passed out in front of your building?' he said. 'Are they going to be violent? This was never a problem before HealthRight 360 moved in.' 'If you ask me, it should be closed down and there should be other approaches to the homeless and drug problem we're all facing,' Bill added.

‘Every morning it’s a roulette. When you show up at your office, are there going to be 10 people passed out in front of your building?’ he said. ‘Are they going to be violent? This was never a problem before HealthRight 360 moved in.’ ‘If you ask me, it should be closed down and there should be other approaches to the homeless and drug problem we’re all facing,’ Bill added.

When the center opened in June, Mayor Breed (pictured) said the center would bring about a change in the lives of 'all San Franciscans.' 'Our city is experiencing a substance use and mental health crisis that is sadly affecting far too many residents,' she said. 'As we continue to address the challenges on our streets, we need to do all that we can to focus our resources and our efforts on those who need it most. The opening of the SoMa RISE Center will not only provide a safe space for individuals in need, but it brings us one step closer to making a difference in these people's lives and the lives of all San Franciscans.'

When the center opened in June, Mayor Breed (pictured) said the center would bring about a change in the lives of ‘all San Franciscans.’ ‘Our city is experiencing a substance use and mental health crisis that is sadly affecting far too many residents,’ she said. ‘As we continue to address the challenges on our streets, we need to do all that we can to focus our resources and our efforts on those who need it most. The opening of the SoMa RISE Center will not only provide a safe space for individuals in need, but it brings us one step closer to making a difference in these people’s lives and the lives of all San Franciscans.’

The center has been allocated at least $4.2million from taxpayers for 2022 and 2023, according to ABC7. Vitka Eisen, the CEO of HealthRight 360 - the entity which operates the center - asked locals to 'be patient with us.' 'We can't fix everything, but we're a piece of that,' Eisen said. 'A piece of the city trying novel things to respond to people experiencing homeless and street drug use and mental illness.'

 The center has been allocated at least $4.2million from taxpayers for 2022 and 2023, according to ABC7. Vitka Eisen, the CEO of HealthRight 360 – the entity which operates the center – asked locals to ‘be patient with us.’ ‘We can’t fix everything, but we’re a piece of that,’ Eisen said. ‘A piece of the city trying novel things to respond to people experiencing homeless and street drug use and mental illness.’

Want more stories like this from the Daily Mail? Visit our profile page here and hit the follow button above for more of the news you need.

Want more stories like this from the Daily Mail? Visit our profile page here and hit the follow button above for more of the news you need.

FOLLOW US ON GOOGLE NEWS

Read original article here

Denial of responsibility! Quick Telecast is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – [email protected]. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Leave a comment
buy kamagra buy kamagra online
Ads Blocker Image Powered by Code Help Pro

Ads Blocker Detected!!!

We have detected that you are using extensions to block ads. Please support us by disabling these ads blocker.

Powered By
Best Wordpress Adblock Detecting Plugin | CHP Adblock