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Tosca review: Another triumphant production for the Royal Opera | Theatre | Entertainment

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Well, it’s four-and-a-half stars really: five if you haven’t seen Jonathan Kent’s magnificent production of this great Puccini opera before; four if you already know how good it is. Dating back to 2006, Kent’s production has had many revivals and they have ranged from magnificent to stunningly perfect. So what makes it so good?

While all this drama is taking place, we are treated to Jonathan Kent’s magnificently powerful staging, from church to Scarpia’s study, to the bleak rooftop execution place, all perfectly rising to match the grandeur of the music and meet the challenge of Puccini’s brilliant score and the drama of the plot.

On this occasion, the title role was magnificently acted and beautifully sung by Swedish soprano Malin Byström, excellently matched by Welsh tenor Gwyn Hughes Jones as Cavaradossi.

The Italian baritone Gabriele Viviani was even better as Scarpia, showing the perfect degree of seething venom to bring out the villainy of the role without ever looking melodramatic.

With the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House under the control of the versatile and experienced Russian conductor Sergei Levitin, it all added up to a superb evening.

If you have not seen an opera before, this Tosca is a good starting place to discover what absorbing entertainment it can offer.

  • Box Office and information: roh.org.uk or 020 7304 4000 (various dates until 21 December)




Well, it’s four-and-a-half stars really: five if you haven’t seen Jonathan Kent’s magnificent production of this great Puccini opera before; four if you already know how good it is. Dating back to 2006, Kent’s production has had many revivals and they have ranged from magnificent to stunningly perfect. So what makes it so good?

While all this drama is taking place, we are treated to Jonathan Kent’s magnificently powerful staging, from church to Scarpia’s study, to the bleak rooftop execution place, all perfectly rising to match the grandeur of the music and meet the challenge of Puccini’s brilliant score and the drama of the plot.

On this occasion, the title role was magnificently acted and beautifully sung by Swedish soprano Malin Byström, excellently matched by Welsh tenor Gwyn Hughes Jones as Cavaradossi.

The Italian baritone Gabriele Viviani was even better as Scarpia, showing the perfect degree of seething venom to bring out the villainy of the role without ever looking melodramatic.

With the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House under the control of the versatile and experienced Russian conductor Sergei Levitin, it all added up to a superb evening.

If you have not seen an opera before, this Tosca is a good starting place to discover what absorbing entertainment it can offer.

  • Box Office and information: roh.org.uk or 020 7304 4000 (various dates until 21 December)

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