Quick Telecast
Expect News First

‘Trippy’ illusion means you can ‘hear’ sound on this silent image

0 65


Can you hear something in this brief video, or is your mind playing tricks on you?

That’s the question everyone who watches this short clip is asking.

WATCH THE VIDEO ABOVE: Can you hear the sound on this silent image?

For more Offbeat related news and videos check out Offbeat >>

The video shows an electricity pylon jumping over power lines like a skipping rope.

Each time it does so, the screen “shakes” as it lands.

Viewers swear they can hear a “thump” or “boing” sound when it lands – but the video has no sound.

This GIF isn’t new, but it has gone viral again after it was recently posted to TikTok.

‘So trippy’

TikTok user Paranormal Princess shared the head-scratching clip to her 2.5 million followers last month.

“This is so trippy,” she wrote.

“It will make you hear things that aren’t really there.”

Some people can hear a ‘thudding’ sound, despite this being a silent gif. Credit: Twitter/IAmHappyToast

The clip, created by Twitter user @IAmHappyToast, went viral in 2017 after it was shared by a psychology expert at the University of Glasgow.

“Does anyone in visual perception know why you can hear this gif?” Dr Lisa DeBruine tweeted.

After creating a survey to see who could “hear” sound in the gif, 75 per cent of respondents said they heard a “thudding sound.”

Fourteen per cent said they heard nothing, while 11 per cent said they heard “something else.”

If you’d like to view this content, please adjust your .

To find out more about how we use cookies, please see our Cookie Guide.

When the gif first went viral, psychologist Gustav Khan said people imagined the sound because that’s what the brain expects to hear when we see a collision or a collapse.

“This illusion works because you have learnt that when larger objects fall to the ground, they result in a thumping sound,” Dr Khan told The Mail Online.

“Some viewers will actually hear the sound, simply because that is what they expect will happen.”

The power of perception

University of Glasgow professor Fiona Macpherson agreed.

“It is expectation that is causing some people to hear the thuds,” she said.

“In the GIF of the jumping pylon, there is a cross-modal expectation (that is, involving more than one sense, such as vision and hearing) effect taking place.

“What people see is affecting what they seem to hear.”

So, which category do you fall into?

Do you hear a thud, or something else, or absolutely nothing at all?

Conversation starter

In the comments section under DeBruine’s poll, Twitter users gave examples of other situations where they had “heard” sound when there wasn’t any.

“Interesting! I’ve been noticing recently that when the TV’s muted I often ‘hear’ people talking on it – without being able to make out what they’re saying, of course,” one person wrote.

“It’s weird to not hear anything, because I get a lot of auditory illusions – say, when kneading bread, I can ‘hear’ the process,” another said.

Others had varying non-scientific takes on why people heard the sound.

“As a non-scientist, my guess is: Hollywood conditioning that dictates that camera shake is accompanied by a certain rumble,” one person wrote.

“I’m having difficulty knowing whether I would have heard anything if I had not read the suggestion in your tweet that I should hear something,” another noted.


Can you hear something in this brief video, or is your mind playing tricks on you?

That’s the question everyone who watches this short clip is asking.

WATCH THE VIDEO ABOVE: Can you hear the sound on this silent image?

For more Offbeat related news and videos check out Offbeat >>

The video shows an electricity pylon jumping over power lines like a skipping rope.

Each time it does so, the screen “shakes” as it lands.

Viewers swear they can hear a “thump” or “boing” sound when it lands – but the video has no sound.

This GIF isn’t new, but it has gone viral again after it was recently posted to TikTok.

‘So trippy’

TikTok user Paranormal Princess shared the head-scratching clip to her 2.5 million followers last month.

“This is so trippy,” she wrote.

“It will make you hear things that aren’t really there.”

Some people can hear a ‘thudding’ sound, despite this being a silent gif. Credit: Twitter/IAmHappyToast

The clip, created by Twitter user @IAmHappyToast, went viral in 2017 after it was shared by a psychology expert at the University of Glasgow.

“Does anyone in visual perception know why you can hear this gif?” Dr Lisa DeBruine tweeted.

After creating a survey to see who could “hear” sound in the gif, 75 per cent of respondents said they heard a “thudding sound.”

Fourteen per cent said they heard nothing, while 11 per cent said they heard “something else.”

If you’d like to view this content, please adjust your .

To find out more about how we use cookies, please see our Cookie Guide.

When the gif first went viral, psychologist Gustav Khan said people imagined the sound because that’s what the brain expects to hear when we see a collision or a collapse.

“This illusion works because you have learnt that when larger objects fall to the ground, they result in a thumping sound,” Dr Khan told The Mail Online.

“Some viewers will actually hear the sound, simply because that is what they expect will happen.”

The power of perception

University of Glasgow professor Fiona Macpherson agreed.

“It is expectation that is causing some people to hear the thuds,” she said.

“In the GIF of the jumping pylon, there is a cross-modal expectation (that is, involving more than one sense, such as vision and hearing) effect taking place.

“What people see is affecting what they seem to hear.”

So, which category do you fall into?

Do you hear a thud, or something else, or absolutely nothing at all?

Conversation starter

In the comments section under DeBruine’s poll, Twitter users gave examples of other situations where they had “heard” sound when there wasn’t any.

“Interesting! I’ve been noticing recently that when the TV’s muted I often ‘hear’ people talking on it – without being able to make out what they’re saying, of course,” one person wrote.

“It’s weird to not hear anything, because I get a lot of auditory illusions – say, when kneading bread, I can ‘hear’ the process,” another said.

Others had varying non-scientific takes on why people heard the sound.

“As a non-scientist, my guess is: Hollywood conditioning that dictates that camera shake is accompanied by a certain rumble,” one person wrote.

“I’m having difficulty knowing whether I would have heard anything if I had not read the suggestion in your tweet that I should hear something,” another noted.

FOLLOW US ON GOOGLE NEWS

Read original article here

Denial of responsibility! Quick Telecast is an automatic aggregator of the all world’s media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, all materials to their authors. If you are the owner of the content and do not want us to publish your materials, please contact us by email – [email protected]. The content will be deleted within 24 hours.

Leave a comment
buy kamagra buy kamagra online
Ads Blocker Image Powered by Code Help Pro

Ads Blocker Detected!!!

We have detected that you are using extensions to block ads. Please support us by disabling these ads blocker.

Powered By
Best Wordpress Adblock Detecting Plugin | CHP Adblock