Are Sinus Rinses Safe? The Biggest Dangers - Quick Telecast Are Sinus Rinses Safe? The Biggest Dangers - Quick Telecast Are Sinus Rinses Safe? The Biggest Dangers - Quick Telecast

Are Sinus Rinses Safe? The Biggest Dangers

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Waking up to find that you can only breathe through your mouth is never fun. Colds and sinus issues can cause a stuffy nose, throbbing headache and even cause swelling. The combination can make it difficult to focus on anything else until you figure out how the heck to unclog your nostrils.

Maybe you’ve considered doing a sinus rinse (also called a nasal rinse) for relief. You’ve heard of other people using a neti pot or bulb syringe. Could it work for you? Before you give it a try, it’s important to know exactly how to do it and what common mistakes to avoid.

Related: Here’s What It Means to Have Yellow Snot—and How to Treat it At Home

What Is a Sinus Rinse and When Can It Be Helpful to Do One?

Primary care physician Dr. Jeffrey S. Gold, MD, says that he often sees patients with seasonal allergies, chronic allergic rhinitis, as well as acute or chronic sinusitis—all conditions that can lead to feeling all stuffed up and dealing with a runny nose. “A sinus rinse can be really beneficial for keeping the mucosal lining of the nasal passage lubricated,” he says. He explains that the drier the inside of the nose is, the more mucosal breakdown there is and the more irritation there can be. This, he says, makes it more likely to get viruses and bacterial infections.



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Waking up to find that you can only breathe through your mouth is never fun. Colds and sinus issues can cause a stuffy nose, throbbing headache and even cause swelling. The combination can make it difficult to focus on anything else until you figure out how the heck to unclog your nostrils.

Maybe you’ve considered doing a sinus rinse (also called a nasal rinse) for relief. You’ve heard of other people using a neti pot or bulb syringe. Could it work for you? Before you give it a try, it’s important to know exactly how to do it and what common mistakes to avoid.

Related: Here’s What It Means to Have Yellow Snot—and How to Treat it At Home

What Is a Sinus Rinse and When Can It Be Helpful to Do One?

Primary care physician Dr. Jeffrey S. Gold, MD, says that he often sees patients with seasonal allergies, chronic allergic rhinitis, as well as acute or chronic sinusitis—all conditions that can lead to feeling all stuffed up and dealing with a runny nose. “A sinus rinse can be really beneficial for keeping the mucosal lining of the nasal passage lubricated,” he says. He explains that the drier the inside of the nose is, the more mucosal breakdown there is and the more irritation there can be. This, he says, makes it more likely to get viruses and bacterial infections.

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