New expanded ANCAP test protocols come into effect from January 2023 - Quick Telecast New expanded ANCAP test protocols come into effect from January 2023 - Quick Telecast New expanded ANCAP test protocols come into effect from January 2023 - Quick Telecast

New expanded ANCAP test protocols come into effect from January 2023

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As we get ready to welcome in 2023, ANCAP’s expanded vehicle rating safety criteria will take effect from January, in line with its European counterpart Euro NCAP and regular protocol enhancements that encourage continual safety improvements every few years.

The previous criteria upgrade took effect from January 2020.

New assessments will include the ability of a vehicle to avoid a crash with a motorcyclist, child presence detection (in the event a child has been left in a locked car) and vehicle submergence, in line with evolving new vehicle safety technologies.

ANCAP has noted that while powered windows and electric door handles may seem like a luxury, they can be an obstacle in an emergency, trapping occupants in flood waters and presenting difficulties for first responders.

From 2023, vehicle manufactures will need to demonstrate how occupants can more easily escape when submerged and how rescuers can gain access.

To this end, ANCAP will assess whether car doors can be opened without battery power and whether electric windows remain functional and able to be opened for up to two minutes after submergence.

Collision avoidance testing is being broadened to include more scenarios, such as AEB Backover to assess auto-braking in reverse with a child pedestrian, AEB Junction (Cyclist) where a cyclist crosses the path of a vehicle turning into a side street, and Cyclist Dooring to alert occupants of a cyclist approaching from behind — or even prevent or delay opening the door.

From 2023, AEB systems that can detect and respond to motorcyclists will also be assessed, the tests including side-swipe-type crashes, intersection-turning scenarios and where a vehicle is approaching a stationary or moving motorcycle from behind.

Several assessment areas will also be enhanced, including:

  • A heighted focus on vehicle-to-vehicle compatibility (introducing a potential 8.00 point penalty compared with the current 4.00 point penalty).
  • A 10 per cent increase to the star rating thresholds for Vulnerable Road User Protection.
  • The assessment of direct driver monitoring systems to manage driver inattention and fatigue.
  • An expansion of autonomous emergency braking test scenarios to include additional night-time tests and child pedestrian avoidance tests when a vehicle is in reverse.

In the lead-up, RAC’s vehicles and fuels manager Alex Forrest said that cars with the maximum 5-star safety ratings would better help you avoid a crash — or reduce its severity, as well as providing you and those around you with better crash protection.

RAC's Alex Forrest.
Camera IconRAC’s Alex Forrest. Credit: Kelsey Reid/The West Australian

“Safety features, such as lane keeping and autonomous emergency braking, as well as a vehicle’s structural design and vulnerable road user protection, all contribute to its safety rating,” he said.

“It is promising to see more safety features become more widely available in affordable vehicles, including adaptive cruise control, speed alert systems and autonomous braking.

“We are urging motorists to do their research when purchasing a new or used car (which means) check the safety features and ratings to ensure you are purchasing the safest car you can afford.”

Vox pop

In July this year, 334 RAC members took part in a survey to test their vehicle safety knowledge.

Only 27 per cent said they knew their vehicle’s ANCAP rating — a drop from 37 per cent in 2020.

Additionally, 72 per cent of respondents had heard of ANCAP, however only six per cent were familiar with Used Car Safety Ratings, which are compiled by the Monash University Accident Research Centre based on actual police-reported crash reports and released each year.

Respondents indicated that reversing cameras/sensors, seatbelt reminders and adaptive cruise control were the three top “most useful” features, saying they were becoming more common in their vehicles, along with autonomous emergency braking and intelligent speed alert systems.

[ad_2]

As we get ready to welcome in 2023, ANCAP’s expanded vehicle rating safety criteria will take effect from January, in line with its European counterpart Euro NCAP and regular protocol enhancements that encourage continual safety improvements every few years.

The previous criteria upgrade took effect from January 2020.

New assessments will include the ability of a vehicle to avoid a crash with a motorcyclist, child presence detection (in the event a child has been left in a locked car) and vehicle submergence, in line with evolving new vehicle safety technologies.

ANCAP has noted that while powered windows and electric door handles may seem like a luxury, they can be an obstacle in an emergency, trapping occupants in flood waters and presenting difficulties for first responders.

From 2023, vehicle manufactures will need to demonstrate how occupants can more easily escape when submerged and how rescuers can gain access.

To this end, ANCAP will assess whether car doors can be opened without battery power and whether electric windows remain functional and able to be opened for up to two minutes after submergence.

Collision avoidance testing is being broadened to include more scenarios, such as AEB Backover to assess auto-braking in reverse with a child pedestrian, AEB Junction (Cyclist) where a cyclist crosses the path of a vehicle turning into a side street, and Cyclist Dooring to alert occupants of a cyclist approaching from behind — or even prevent or delay opening the door.

From 2023, AEB systems that can detect and respond to motorcyclists will also be assessed, the tests including side-swipe-type crashes, intersection-turning scenarios and where a vehicle is approaching a stationary or moving motorcycle from behind.

Several assessment areas will also be enhanced, including:

  • A heighted focus on vehicle-to-vehicle compatibility (introducing a potential 8.00 point penalty compared with the current 4.00 point penalty).
  • A 10 per cent increase to the star rating thresholds for Vulnerable Road User Protection.
  • The assessment of direct driver monitoring systems to manage driver inattention and fatigue.
  • An expansion of autonomous emergency braking test scenarios to include additional night-time tests and child pedestrian avoidance tests when a vehicle is in reverse.

In the lead-up, RAC’s vehicles and fuels manager Alex Forrest said that cars with the maximum 5-star safety ratings would better help you avoid a crash — or reduce its severity, as well as providing you and those around you with better crash protection.

RAC's Alex Forrest.
Camera IconRAC’s Alex Forrest. Credit: Kelsey Reid/The West Australian

“Safety features, such as lane keeping and autonomous emergency braking, as well as a vehicle’s structural design and vulnerable road user protection, all contribute to its safety rating,” he said.

“It is promising to see more safety features become more widely available in affordable vehicles, including adaptive cruise control, speed alert systems and autonomous braking.

“We are urging motorists to do their research when purchasing a new or used car (which means) check the safety features and ratings to ensure you are purchasing the safest car you can afford.”

Vox pop

In July this year, 334 RAC members took part in a survey to test their vehicle safety knowledge.

Only 27 per cent said they knew their vehicle’s ANCAP rating — a drop from 37 per cent in 2020.

Additionally, 72 per cent of respondents had heard of ANCAP, however only six per cent were familiar with Used Car Safety Ratings, which are compiled by the Monash University Accident Research Centre based on actual police-reported crash reports and released each year.

Respondents indicated that reversing cameras/sensors, seatbelt reminders and adaptive cruise control were the three top “most useful” features, saying they were becoming more common in their vehicles, along with autonomous emergency braking and intelligent speed alert systems.

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